What do I do when I’m not coaching?

There are moments as a coach when we are not training, and those are very useful periods to keep growing, take some perspective on things and analyze certain aspects of the game that are difficult, at least for me, when you are coaching. I’m going to tell you how I structure my time and how is a day in my life now that I’m awaiting future projects.

 

The first thing I do is to plan and divide the day in time slots to devote it to my job as a coach and to other activities such as reading, being with the family or practicing sports.

 

The first time slot of the day is devoted to analyzing teams. After the formation to local coaches I gave in China where I talked about positional play, I continue to deepen in this playing style and training methodology, so I use the first slot of about four hours in the morning to analyze teams such as Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City, Sampaoli’s Sevilla, Tuchel’s Borussia Dortmund and Ariel Holan’s Defensa y Justicia. Also if during the weekend I saw any interesting match I cut sequences of teams I liked such as Sarri’s Napoli, Klopp’s Liverpool and Pochettino’s Tottenham. Every day I try to analyze and cut playing sequences that I can analyze in depth and also show my future teams in order to internalize some aspects of the play in a simple way.

 

I devote the second time slot, in the afternoon, to my family, practice some sport and no more than two hours to learn languages. I’ve been learning Chinese for some time now with the method 8belts (www.8belts.com) and I’ve just started with Japanese with a personal teacher that I hired through the web (www.grapclass). This way, I try to learn two languages that seduce me and, in case I had the opportunity to coach in those countries, would be able to have some knowledge of them. After the experience this summer in China and observing Guardiola coach in Munich last February, I realized the importance for us as coaches to be able to communicate with the players in their own language, even in a simple way. They appreciate it a lot and value the effort made to know their language. It is not that much about dominating it but being able to communicate with them and use some technical training terms. It wasn’t the case of Guardiola, who did dominate German perfectly. At least, I thought so!

 

The third time slot comes during the night, when I’m more relaxed and I watch matches, more with the purpose of scouting players and widen my knowledge of the market. I’m now analyzing players from J-League 1 and J-League 2 in Japan, and also the Asian national teams who are now playing the qualifying rounds for Russia 2018 World Cup.

 

This way I keep myself active, I keep preparing myself and growing as a coach for future projects, and analyzing players who could adapt to the playing style I like to implement in my teams.